Sunday, 30 October 2016

Joseph Beuys Drawings

Yesterday I visited the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh to see the excellent Artists Rooms exhibition "Joseph Beuys:  A Language of Drawing".  It was so refreshing to see how he linked drawings of different media to his ideas and made them work together.  Here is a quotation from the exhibition:

Beuy's work took many forms, employing all kinds of media to create single sculptures large and small, objects for vitrines, films, "Actions" and lectures illustrated with blackboard drawings. Beuys regarded drawing as the "first visible form" of his ideas.  He explained, "I ask questions, I put forms of language on paper, a language to stimulate more searching discussion".  The drawings, he felt, became a "kind of reservoir that I can utilise again and again" 

Sunday, 23 October 2016

Hari Kunzru on tolerance

I think that Hari Kunzru puts the case for tolerance and understanding very well in this recent article 

  Jonathan Franzen claimed he won’t write about race because of limited ‘firsthand experience’, while Lionel Shriver hopes objection to ‘cultural appropriation is a passing fad’. So should there be boundaries on what a novelist can write about?


Hari Kunzru

Clearly, if writers were barred from creating characters with attributes that we do not “own” (gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and so on), fiction would be impossible. Stories would be peopled by clones of the author. Since trespassing into otherness is a foundation of the novelist’s work, should we restrict ourselves in some way, so as to avoid doing violence to those who identify with our characters? The injunction to refrain from “cultural appropriation” sounds like a call for censorship, or at best a warning to self-censor, an infringement of the creative liberty to which so many surprising people profess themselves attached.

It is true that the politics of offence are used to shut down dissident voices of all kinds, frequently in minority communities, and the understanding of culture as a type of property to which ownership can be definitively assigned is, at the very least, problematic. Should the artist go forth boldly, without fear? Of course, but he or she should also tread with humility. Note that I do not say, “with care”. I don’t believe any subject matter should a priori be off limits to anyone, or that harm necessarily flows from the kind of ventriloquism that all novelists perform. Quite the opposite. Attempting to think one’s way into other subjectivities, other experiences, is an act of ethical urgency. For those who have never experienced the luxury of normativity, the warm and fuzzy feeling of being the world’s default setting, humility in the face of otherness seems like a minimal demand. Yet it appears that for some, the call to listen before speaking, to refrain from asserting immediate authority, is so unfamiliar that it feels outrageous. I’m being silenced! My freedom is being abridged! Norm is unaccustomed to humility because he has grown up as master of the house. All the hats are his to wear. For the deviant others, who came in by the kitchen door, it has always been expected, even demanded.
Good writers transgress without transgressing, in part because they are humble about what they do not know. They treat their own experience of the world as provisional. They do not presume. They respect people, not by leaving them alone in the inviolability of their cultural authenticity, but by becoming involved with them. They research. They engage in reciprocal relationships. It does not seem like a particular infringement of liberty to pass through the world without being its owner, unless someone else is continually asserting property rights over the ground beneath your feet. The panicked tone of the accusations of censorship leads me to suspect that what is being asserted has little to do with artistic freedom per se, and everything to do with a bitter fight to retain normative status, and the privileges that flow from it. The solution is simple, my fearful friends. Give up. Accept that some things are not for you, and others are not about you. You will find you have lost nothing. It may even feel like a weight off your shoulders. Put down that burden and pull up a chair. You might hear something you haven’t heard before. You will, at least, hear some new stories.

Friday, 21 October 2016

Venice in October

Historic Castello quarter where I stayed

View from my room:)
Just around the corner

The Maritime Museum
Portrait by/of Bellini in Accademia Art Gallery
Two of the original bronze horses of San Marco

San Marco piazza from above
Flying visit to Venice to see the Architecture Biennale, here are a few fleeting impressions from the city

Tuesday, 11 October 2016

Waqas Khan

Waqas Khan


Jonathan Jones in this article:

asks "How can you express love in art?  One way is to make it with love.  Art created by a devoted hand projects its kindness into the space around it and the hearts of those who view it".

Elphida Hadzi-Vasileva at Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham

Fragility - drapes made from pig guts

A detail from Fragility ( I think)
A section of zebra heart

Haruspex - sections of pig gut

This artist, Elphida Hadzi-Vasileva,  works with internal organs of animals to create installations and sculptures.  I like this take on anatomy.